Posts Tagged ‘Disney’

Ten More 2019 Movies Summarised in Ten Words Each

More for you.

This is by far the quickest I’ve got to 20 new-release movies in a year, as we’re still only in August. Sadly it’s a lower-quality batch than the first ten of 2019, but I still enjoyed myself with most of these, and there’s still plenty of time to bring the year home strong.
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1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

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Aladdin

Surprisingly strong visuals, Will Smith is back, Naomi Scott DESTROYS.”

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X-Men: Dark Phoenix

One amazing train sequence can’t save this disappointing saga finale.”

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Movie Review: Zootopia

Can’t believe this is my first movie review of the year. What a crazy three months it’s been.

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Starring:
Ginnifer Goodwin, Jason Bateman, Idris Elba
Director:s
Byron Howard (Tangled), Rich Moore, Jared Bush (Wreck-It Ralph)
Rating: PG
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Well Disney, that’s five in a row.

The so-called “third golden age” of films from Disney’s main animated studio is still going – at least for another year or so – because Zootopia is pretty fantastic. A cocktail of painstakingly realised world-building packed with culturally relevant sight gags, Zootopia sells a vision of an idealised world with an all-too-familiar undercurrent of ugliness bubbling underneath. It’s one of the sharpest allegories for real-world social issues I’ve seen in an animated movie, and while occasionally a little overzealous in its desire to ensure its message gets across, Zootopia never halts its refreshingly-paced plot or sacrifices the believability of its colourful characters to do so, making it a quality movie for all kinds of audiences. Thanks to co-directors Byron Howard, Rich Moore and Jared Bush alongside a suite of animators at the top of their game, the House of Mouse has extended its hot streak.

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Movie Review: Saving Mr Banks

Time to get started on a new year of reviews! I’ve got a double for you to start things off.

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Starring:
Tom Hanks, Emma Thompson, Colin Farrell
Director: John Lee Hancock (The Alamo, The Blind Side)
Rating: PG
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Disney is currently in a position quite unfamiliar to the vast majority of the world’s entertainment media companies, let alone one of such gigantic size. Not only does the American monolith own the wildly successful Marvel cinematic universe, which surely has to be the most fruitful gamble of the movie-making decade, but its own traditional primary animation studio is in the midst of a notable renaissance of quality. They still have the very active geniuses at Pixar in their stable, and their recent acquisition of the Star Wars license has yet to boil over into significant fanboy argument (which it will, make no mistake, once Episode VII finally comes out). So for Disney to deliver a no-frills live action film as good as Saving Mr Banks right now is a little bit ridiculous. Surely they are only allowed so much good fortune at once.

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Movie Review: Monsters University

Unlike last year, I have now somehow managed to see all of the late-June movie releases that I wanted to in 2013, as of a couple of nights ago. Perhaps a little late, but there was a lot of good stuff to see! Two reviews coming right up.

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Starring:
Billy Crystal, John Goodman, Helen Mirren
Director:
Dan Scanlon (Tracy)
Rating: G
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It’s been a long time since the original Monsters Inc, a movie I fondly remember watching in the cinemas as a kid all the way back in 2001. The movie was instrumental in building a quite frankly phenomenal track record for Pixar Animation Studios, a run of form that only grew even more impressive over time until it finally began to lose steam a couple of years ago with Cars 2. The studio became well-known for surprising its audiences by finding clever new ways of tugging at their heartstrings, as well as delivering messages with at least some degree of subtlety. Following last year’s good but unusually by-the-numbers effort Brave, however, there has been somewhat of a backlash against the company. A rather undeserved backlash. Critics and general audiences alike had come to expect a certain sentimental ingredient in their Pixar films and when it stopped coming, their collective sigh of disappointment descended on Hollywood like a grossly overinflated black cloud, particularly after Disney’s Pixar-less Wreck-It Ralph turned out so well last year.

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